Megan Dowsett is a freelance creative consultant working with museums and galleries.

Through the name Norris and the Flamingo, she shares the sense of adventure that runs through all of life, wherever we are on our journey. A sense of imagination, of possibility and discovery, for children and adults alike.

Her core values come down to two simple things:

People: At the heart of everything she does, people are there – be it audiences of any age or background, volunteers, staff or freelancers and apprentices. She believes that the best projects take everybody with them on a learning journey.

Creativity: In every role she’s taken, creativity has played a key priority. Working in Museums and Galleries, creativity brings a valuable opportunity to think about the same things in a different way.

Museums and galleries are the perfect place to bring the joy of discovery and magic of adventure to everyone who passes through the doors - and to invite those who haven't yet braved these sometimes intimidating buildings, to do so in a dynamic and inviting way.

Over twelve years working in these exciting settings, Megan has developed extensive experience in both managing and delivering creative projects that engage with a wide variety of audiences.

27 January 2011

Printing Fairy Castles

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I've started a printmaking course to keep me warm in London after the sunshine of South America. For now, as I experiment with drypoint and collograph, lino and aquatint, I am using the above sketch of a Montevideo magical palace (or administrative building). Below, a play with drypoint ...

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25 January 2011

Flying Clocks

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A happy hour spent sketching the eclecticities of a cafe in Buenos Aires ...

5 January 2011

The Cultural Mile

Cordoba's Cultural Mile wasn't quite the bohemian mish mash of art, studios, galleries and noise that I'd expected, but it's final museum, the Museo Emilio Caraffa, was a creative highlight of my journey. 4 floors of mesmerising, contrasting art. From the mysterious, slightly sinister and occasionally even horrific photography of Marcos Lopez, I passed through a room of surreal paintings by Ezequiel Linares - his painting style reminded me of a purple and emerald Frances Bacon, but I fell in love with his sketches on paper - reminiscent of Toulouse-Lautrec, but a world of tango rather than the Moulin Rouge.

My mind was already full, but the peaceful tranquility of and visual simplicity of Raul Diaz got me again, especially since his exhibition was themed 'A Walk on Water' ... water has been a guiding theme of my travels, I think.
And finally, a textile group, La Rueca, in case I had forgotten, reminded me of the joys of texture in all things.

Oh. And the Education Space, with it's cushions textures, and entire dedicated, visitable, participative space on the way through the galleries, was to die for!