Megan Dowsett is a freelance creative consultant working with museums and galleries.

Through the name Norris and the Flamingo, she shares the sense of adventure that runs through all of life, wherever we are on our journey. A sense of imagination, of possibility and discovery, for children and adults alike.

Her core values come down to two simple things:

People: At the heart of everything she does, people are there – be it audiences of any age or background, volunteers, staff or freelancers and apprentices. She believes that the best projects take everybody with them on a learning journey.

Creativity: In every role she’s taken, creativity has played a key priority. Working in Museums and Galleries, creativity brings a valuable opportunity to think about the same things in a different way.

Museums and galleries are the perfect place to bring the joy of discovery and magic of adventure to everyone who passes through the doors - and to invite those who haven't yet braved these sometimes intimidating buildings, to do so in a dynamic and inviting way.

Over twelve years working in these exciting settings, Megan has developed extensive experience in both managing and delivering creative projects that engage with a wide variety of audiences.

28 March 2017

Linda Kitson's Mark Making

I popped along to the House of Illustration for the first time, to see a tiny, lovely exhibition about Linda Kitson, a war artist and landscape artist, among other things.  I was utterly inspired by her mark making.  Yes, initially drawn to it by the idea that there are still, in the modern era of photography, war-artists, and all the more so that she was the first female war artist (I can't picture a more 'man's environment' for a female artist to set out in), and the whole visualisation of how the experience of travelling to the Falklands must have been for her.
But once there, I found myself primarily mesmerised by the variety of marks and media that she used to create her drawings.  I often try to interest myself in developing more 'shaded' drawings, and yet here is another 'line' artist who creates all her depth and texture through the breadth of her marks.  And lines drawn in an enormous selection of pens and pencils, even in a black and white picture.
I was also inspired by the subtle introduction of colour into black and white pictures - the complexity of colour decisions still intimidates me, and I'm persistently attracted to the simplicity of black and white, but I liked the way she adds small areas of colour here and there.

While I was there, I also visited an exhibition of Jo Brocklehurst's work.  Watch this space for a few thoughts!